Helping Children Develop to their Full Potential

Early Intervention Services

Anne Carlsen Early Intervention provides home-based services that focus on the family. We help identify learning opportunities and provide material and emotional support, instruction, information, and resources so parents and caregivers can help their children learn and develop to their full potential.

Early Intervention

Anne Carlsen Early Intervention offers home-based services where professionals and parents/caregivers work together as partners to help the child learn and participate as independently as possible in their everyday life. This approach focuses on the whole child and family rather than a specific area of development because development in children does not occur in separate areas. We empower parents as their child’s first and best teachers and therapists.

This approach focuses on the whole child rather than a specific area of development because development in children does not occur in separate areas.

Anne Carlsen Early Intervention provides free comprehensive developmental evaluations to all children who are referred to the program regardless of eligibility. Even if the child is not found eligible for Early Intervention, parents will still have the opportunity to participate in the evaluation, and receive a detailed report outlining the child’s unique strengths and needs, including specific skills to work on.

Additional recommendations for strategies to use with the child or other activities and services in the community that may be beneficial are also included. If you have a concern about a child, please don’t hesitate to contact Anne Carlsen Early Intervention.

Anyone can make a referral by calling 701-364-2663.



Early Intervention FAQs

    Research has…

  • Indicated that parent/caregiver participation is the key to a successful early intervention program.
  • Shown that children learn best from parents and caregivers in natural environments where numerous learning opportunities occur daily throughout the child’s regular routines and activities.

    Infants or toddlers under the age of 3 who have:

  • Developmental delays in the area(s) of: language, cognitive, fine motor, gross motor, social/emotional, or self-help skills.
  • High-risk conditions: a medical diagnosis that is associated with a high risk for developmental delays.
  • Eligibility for Anne Carlsen Early Intervention is based on a comprehensive developmental evaluation that is completed by a Speech/Language Pathologist, Occupational Therapist, and/or Special Education professional. A child with a high-risk condition may be found automatically eligible for Early Intervention, but a developmental evaluation will be done to determine each child’s unique strengths and needs.

    Anne Carlsen Early Intervention is an infant development service in North Dakota providing home-based, family-focused services at no cost to families. We provide:

  • Free developmental evaluations completed by Speech/Language Pathologists, Occupational Therapists, and/or Special Education Professionals
  • Individual program planning
  • Lending Library- toys, resources, and adaptive equipment
  • Parent Support
  • Home programming including specialized consultations provided by Early Intervention staff
  • Information and referral to other services if needed
  • Transition planning and coordination for Early Childhood Special Education, preschools, and other services after age three
  • Consultation with child care providers, grandparents, and others

Anne Carlsen Early Intervention offers home-based services where professionals and parents/caregivers work together as partners to help the child learn and participate as independently as possible in their everyday life. This approach focuses on the whole child and family rather than a specific area of development because development in children does not occur in separate areas. We empower parents as their child’s first and best teachers and therapists.

This approach focuses on the whole child rather than a specific area of development because development in children does not occur in separate areas.

    Our services are provided:

  • In the child’s home
  • Child care centers
  • Grandparents’ homes
  • Parks, playgrounds
  • We can even provide support by accompanying families to medical appointments
  • Other natural environments within the community
If you have a concern for a child, please call your Regional Early Intervention Program:

  • Fargo (Cass, Ransom, Richland, Sargent, Steele & Traill Counties) (701) 364-2663
  • Grand Forks ( (Grand Forks, Nelson, Pembina & Walsh Counties) (701) 775-8934 ext. 21
  • Jamestown (Barnes, Dickey, Foster, Griggs, LaMoure, Logan, McIntosh, Stutsman & Wells Counties) (701) 952- 3500
  • Devils Lake (Benson, Cavalier, Eddy, Ramsey, Roulette, & Towner Counties) (701)662-6324


Healthy Infant Development FAQs

    Cognitive Development:

  • Looks back and forth between two objects
  • Watches an object moved slowly through the line of sight

    Communicative Development:

  • Startled by loud noises
  • Turns head toward speaker
  • Makes noises other than crying
  • Differentiated cry for fatigue, hunger and pain

    Social or Emotional:

  • Looks at adult face.
  • Stops crying when talked to, picked up, or comforted
  • Turns at will toward or away from person or situation

    Adaptive:

  • Sucking reflex: sucks nipple when placed in mouth
  • Rooting reflex: turns mouth toward hand rubbing cheek
  • Opens mouth and sticks out tongue in anticipation of feeding when seeing breast or bottle
  • Expresses displeasure when clothes are pulled over head
  • Enjoys bath; keeps eyes open and indicates pleasure when placed in warm water
  • Sleeps at 4 – 10-hour intervals

    Physical:

  • Walking reflex: when held upright with feet resting on flat surface, lifts feet alternately in walking-like motion
  • Closes fingers when light pressure is applied to open palm
  • Lifts and rotates head
  • Lifts head 45 degrees with support of elbows
  • Kicks reciprocally when on back
  • Extends both legs when on stomach

    Nutrition:

  • Breast or bottle feed on demand
  • Hold baby to feed
  • Give only breast milk or formula
  • Burps as needed through feeding

Cognitive:

  • Looks toward noise
  • Mouths toys
  • Bangs toys
  • Repeats arm or leg movement to cause an action to recur
  • Pulls cloth from face
  • Reaches for and grasps toy

Communicative:

  • Looks directly at speaker
  • Vocalizes in response to speaker
  • Vocalizes pleasure and pain
  • Laughs out loud
  • Self-initiated vocal play: coos, chuckles, gurgles, and laughs
  • Pitch and intonation vary

Social or Emotional:

  • Smiles at own reflection in mirror
  • Expresses desire to be picked up
  • Smiles in response to speaker

Adaptive:

  • Uses tongue to reject pureed foods
  • Holds or supports bottle during feeding
  • Sleeps through the night; takes 2-3 naps during the day

Physical:

  • Holds toy 10-15 seconds
  • Holds small object
  • Opens hand in anticipation of contact
  • When pulled to sitting, holds head in line with body
  • Brings hands together when lying on back
  • Bounces when standing and supported by adult

Nutrition:

  • Do not put baby to bed with bottle
  • Give breast mild of formula with ir
  • on (baby is not ready for cow’s milk)

  • Do not add cereal to bottle

At 6 Months:

  • Introduce infant juice in small amount
  • Iron-fortified cereal may be introduced in small amounts, using spoon
  • As child progresses and shows signs of chewing motion, you may offer mashed or soft foods

    Cognitive Development:

  • Drops toy without watching results
  • Finds toy that is partially hidden
  • Finds toy that is completely hidden (begins to understand that objects continue to exist even when they cannot be seen)
  • Shakes toy
  • Moves to get toy

    Communicative Development:

  • Expresses facial expressions, actions, and familiar sounds
  • Comprehends parental gestures
  • Looks at objects, family members, and pictures when named
  • Babbles /m/, /n/, /t/, /d/, /b/, /p/, and /z/
  • Vocalizes to another person
  • Vocalizes differently for hunger, anger and contentment

    Social or Emotional:

  • Expresses physical states such as anger, tiredness, excitement, and hunger
  • Extends arms to familiar persons
  • Responds differently to caregiver and strangers
  • Interacts by smiling and cooing
  • Infant-to-infant interactions increase
  • Responds differently to children and adults
  • Recognizes self in mirror

    Adaptive:

  • Closes lip when swallowing
  • Sleeps through the night; 1-2 naps during the day
  • Brings food to mouth with whole hand
  • Shows definite likes and dislikes for various foods

    Physical:

  • Rakes or scoops small objects with hand
  • Transfers object from hand to hand
  • Picks up objects easily
  • Rolls from back to stomach
  • Crawls forward on belly
  • When sitting, extends arm if falling to the side
  • Pulls self up to standing
  • Holds small object between thumb and index finger
  • Sits alone briefly without support

    Nutrition:

    At 6 months:

  • Introduce infant juice in small amount
  • Iron-fortified cereal may be introduced in small amounts, using spoon
  • As child progresses and shows signs of chewing motion, you may offer mashed or soft foods

    At 9 months:

  • Encourage to feed self – messes will happen
  • Give finger foods
  • Cut table foods into tiny pieces – offer small amounts – watch for mouth stuffing
  • Never put to bed with the bottle
  • Start decreasing breast or bottle feedings as baby eats more food

    Cognitive Development:

  • Adult starts and stops toy. After the toy’s movement stops, the infant touches the toy or adult to reactivate the toy
  • Turns over the black side of a card to view picture
  • Intentionally drops toy and watches it fall
  • Shakes toy
  • Moves to get toy

    Communicative Development:

  • Briefly stops behavior when told “no”
  • Begins to relate names and objects
  • Turns when called by name
  • Gives object upon request
  • Claps hands and waves on command
  • Articulates most speech sounds
  • Gestures/vocalizes wants and needs
  • Directs others physically; pats, pulls, pushes, and tugs

    Social or Emotional:

  • Repeats actions that elicit laughter/attention from others
  • Plays simple games: pat-a-cake, peek-a-boo
  • Often attached to favorite toy or blanket
  • Exhibits fear or reluctance toward strangers
  • Expresses affection (e.g., hugging, patting)
  • Expresses two or more emotions (e.g., pleasure, fear, sadness)

    Adaptive:

  • Pulls off own socks
  • Closes mouth on rim of cup but loses liquid from corners of mouth
  • Feeds self finger foods
  • Picks up cup and takes 4-5 swallows
  • Begins to cooperate when being dressed (e.g., helps put arms in holes)
  • Fusses when diaper needs to be changed
  • Bowels move regularly

    Physical:

  • Cruises holding onto furniture
  • Can poke with index finger
  • Stands alone momentarily
  • Walks with adult holding one hand
  • Creeps well
  • Claps hands
  • Corrals ball with arms and hands when sitting with legs spread apart
  • Moves body to music

    Nutrition:

    At 9 months:

  • Encourage to feed self – messes will happen
  • Give finger foods
  • Cut table foods into tiny pieces – offer small amounts – watch for mouth stuffing
  • Never put to bed with the bottle
  • Start decreasing breast or bottle feedings as baby eats more food

    At 12 months:

  • Serve liquids only in a cup
  • Encourage self-feeding with spoon and cup
  • Offer 3 meals a day, plus snacks
  • Include baby at family meals
  • Switch from formula to whole milk

    Cognitive:

  • Manages 3-4 toys by setting one aside when given a new toy
  • Pulls object up from floor with string
  • Gives toy to someone to wind up
  • Activates toy after adult demonstration
  • Polls wheeled toys
  • Places things in cup; dumps out contents
  • Demonstrates use of everyday items (e.g., pretends to drink from cup)

    Communicative:

  • Says “Mama” or “Dada” discriminately
  • Points to objects when named
  • Responds vocally to “wh” questions
  • Acknowledges others’ speech by eye contact, speech, or repetition of the word said
  • Uses sentence-like intonation (jargon); imitates some words
  • Uses single words; says 3-20 words
  • Protests by saying “no,” shaking head, moving away, or frowning
  • Points to wanted object
  • Says “all gone,” asks for “more”
  • Teases, scolds, warns using gestures and vocalizations
  • Responds to the directions “in” and “on”

    Social or Emotional:

  • When faced with a novel situation, looks to parents for reassurance
  • Shows emerging independence by moving around a familiar room in a playful, exploratory manner (still may require some supervision and encouragement)
  • When playing on his or her own, may periodically return to the parent for reassurance and attention (likes to know adult is near)
  • Plays alone for short periods
  • Contacts with peers center on a toy, and adult, etc.
  • Brings toy to share with caregiver

    Adaptive:

  • Chews textured foods
  • Spoon-feeds and drinks from cup independently – frequent spills
  • Sleeps through the night; one nap during the day
  • Cooperates when dressing and undressing
  • Stirs with spoon
  • Sips liquid from cup using a straw

    Physical:

  • Squats to play
  • Kicks stationary ball forward
  • Drops objects into small container
  • Stacks 2-4 objects on top or one another
  • Starts and stops in walking
  • Walks up and down stairs with assistance, placing both feet on each step
  • Enjoys pushing or pulling toys while walking
  • Takes independent steps
  • Maintains balance while kneeling
  • Walks backwards
  • Creeps backward down steps
  • Holds crayon with fingers, hand on top, forearm turned so thumb is directed downward

    Nutrition:

    At 12 months:

  • Serve liquids only in a cup
  • Encourage self-feeding with spoon and cup
  • Offer 3 meals a day, plus snacks
  • Include baby at family meals
  • Switch from formula to whole milk

    At 15 months:

  • Keep encouraging self-feeding using spoon, fork and fingers
  • Should be drinking only from cup
  • Expect strong food preferences – offer a variety, but do not force-feed

    At 18 months:

  • Growth is slow – appetite decreases
  • Can be picky, negative behavior
  • Maintain relaxed approach to eating
  • Offer a variety of foods – allow child to choose
  • Avoid using food as reward or punishment

    Cognitive:

  • Looks at storybook pictures with adult, naming or pointing to familiar objects on request
  • Uses stick to get out-of-reach toy
  • Activates toy without adult demonstration
  • Looks for familiar person who has left the room
  • Spontaneously names objects
  • Turns pages in book
  • Inserts shapes into matching slots

    Communicative:

  • Says 50 words
  • Names familiar objects
  • Uses ritual words “hi,” and “bye”
  • Understands approximately 300 words
  • Listens as pictures are named
  • Points to five body parts
  • Responds to yes/no questions by shaking or nodding head
  • Produces words with consonant-vowel-consonant structure
  • Combines words to make two-word phrases
  • Mean sentence length = 1.8 words
  • Uses commands (e.g., “move”), possessives (e.g., “mine”), reactions (e.g., “owee”)
  • Follows a series of two related commands (e.g., “Pick up the ball and give it to me”)

    Social or Emotional:

  • Has temper tantrums when frustrated
  • Frequently does the opposite of what he or she is asked to do
  • Curious, gets into everything
  • Often defiant; says “no” to many requests
  • Enjoys simple make-believe
  • Has difficulty sharing
  • Usually plays alone even when other children are present
  • Helps put things away
  • Insists on trying to do many things without help (e.g., eating with a spoon, drinking from a cup)
  • Engages in make-believe and pretend play
  • Plays well for brief time in groups of two or three children

    Adaptive:

  • Begins using fork
  • Squats, holds self, or verbalizes bowel and bladder needs (50% of the time)
  • Brushes teeth with assistance
  • Tries to wash own hands and face
  • Removes loose clothing such as a jacket or shorts without assistance

    Physical:

  • Scribbles vigorously with crayons or markers
  • Imitates vertical strokes
  • Walks on a straight line
  • Stacks 4-6 objects
  • Following demonstration, throws small ball overhand at least 3 feet

    Nutrition:

    At 18 months:

  • Growth is slow – appetite decreases
  • Can be picky, negative behavior
  • Maintain relaxed approach to eating
  • Offer a variety of foods – allow child to choose
  • Avoid using food as reward or punishment

    At 24 months:

  • Check portion sizes – rule of thumb: 1 Tbsp for each year of age
  • Definite likes/dislikes – keep offering a variety of foods
  • Provide snacks as part of the daily intake
  • Expect only one good meal a day or even 2-3 days at times
  • Watch milk/juice intakes. Too much fluid can decrease appetite for solid foods

Cognitive:

  • Understands “one,” “all” (e.g., Give me one block)
  • Sequences related actions in play such as preparig food for doll, feeding it, wiping its mouth
  • Matches an object to its picture
  • Uses pretend objects in play
  • Repeats finger play with words and actions
  • Matches simple shapes such as circle, square, and triangle

    Communicative:

  • Understands approximately 500 words
  • May omit some final consonants or substitute one consonant for another (e.g., /w/ for /r/)
  • Says 200 words
  • Mean sentence length = 3.1 words
  • Knows “big/little”
  • Answers “what/where” questions (e.g., “What do you hear with?”)
  • Uses some regular plurals (e.g., cats)
  • Asks basic questions (“Daddy gone?”)
  • Asks simple “what/where” questions (e.g., “What’s that?”)
  • Whispers

    Social or Emotional:

  • Asks for assistance when having difficulty
  • Shy with strangers, especially adults
  • Claims certain articles as being his or her own
  • Attempts to comfort others in distress
  • Sings familiar songs with adults
  • Shows pride in accomplishments
  • Separates from parent in familiar surroundings without crying

    Adaptive:

  • Takes off own shoes, socks and some pants
  • Independently eats entire meal with spoon
  • Tries to wash self
  • Less frequent eliminations
  • Site on toilet for at least 1 minute supervised
  • Puts on socks, coat and shirt
  • Opens door by turning handle

    Physical:

  • Imitates circular, vertical and horizontal strokes
  • Rolls, pounds and squeezes clay
  • Stacks 6-7 blocks
  • Walks up steps, alternating feed in adult fashion while holding on
  • Jumps in place with both feeth together
  • Snips paper with scissors
  • Catches ball from straight arm position, trapping ball against chest
  • Uses one hand consistently in most activities

Cognitive:

  • Draws face from model
  • Matches three colors
  • Matches objects by color, shape and size

Communicative:

  • Understands approximately 900 words
  • Points to pictures of common objects described by their use (e.g., “Show me what you eat with”)
  • Knows third-person pronouns (e.g., he, she)
  • Articulates /p/, /m/, /n/, /w/, and /h/
  • Says 500 words
  • Mean sentence length = 3.4 words
  • Refers to self by own name
  • Uses pronouns (e.g., me, you, mine)

Social or Emotional:

  • Says “please” and “thank you” when reminded
  • Spends most group time in solitary activity, watching other children
  • States whether he or she is a boy or a girl

Adaptive:

  • Gets drink from fountain
  • Stabs food with fork and brings to mouth
  • Daytime control of toileting needs with occasional accidents

Physical:

  • Threads four small beads on string
  • Copies drawing a circle
  • Stands on one foot for 3 seconds
  • Can jump over a string 2 inches of the floor


Contact a Program Coordinator near you

Fargo:

Stefanie Kaiser

Program Coordinator
Fargo
701-551-1741
stefanie.kaiser@annecenter.org

Contact Stefanie


Grand Forks:

Ramona Gunderson

Program Coordinator
Grand Forks
701-757-4200
ramona.gunderson@annecenter.org

Contact Ramona


Jamestown:

Gail Loftsgard

Program Coordinator
Jamestown
701-952-3500
gail.loftsgard@annecenter.org

Contact Gail


Devils Lake:

Nancy Brustad

Program Coordinator
Devils Lake
701-662-6324
nancy.brustad@annecenter.org

Contact Nancy

View the Early Intervention Brochure


Early Intervention Works

See how Anne Carlsen’s Early Intervention program is empowering families with the resources they need to teach their children to grow, learn, and play.


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Locations

Office building

Devils Lake

  • Address
  • 218 NW 4th Street | Devils Lake, ND 58301

  • Hours:
  • 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM

  • Phone:
  • 701-662-6324

  • Email:
  • devilslakes@annecenter.org


    Office building

    Fargo

  • Address
  • 4152 30th Ave | Suite 102 | Fargo, ND 58104

  • Hours:
  • 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM

  • Phone:
  • 701-364-2663

  • Email:
  • fargoinfo@annecenter.org


    Office building

    Grand Forks

  • Address
  • 2016 South Washington Street | Grand Forks, ND 58201

  • Hours:
  • 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM

  • Phone:
  • 701-757-4200

  • Email:
  • grandforksinfo@annecenter.org


    Office building

    Jamestown

  • Address
  • 814 13th Street North East | Jamestown, ND 58402

  • Hours:
  • 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM

  • Phone:
  • 701-952-9820

  • Email:
  • jamestowninfo@annecenter.org